Posts Tagged ‘Heart disease’

Diet advice for 2012 – from Cleveland Clinic

January 5, 2012

It’s  a new year and I resolve to write more blog posts this year than last. So, I’ll start with what is on many people’s minds now: which diet should I choose? Here is the latest from a respected source – Cleveland Clinic.

This New Year’s, losing weight will undoubtedly top many Americans’ list of resolutions – and it’s an important one. One reason? Heart disease is the main health threat caused by obesity. Make your efforts to slim down more successful this year by becoming wise to the “secret of calories!”  …

Just follow these 5 rules:

1. Understand the basic principal of dieting for weight loss. With all of the opposing diet plans forbidding carbohydrates or preaching against fat, it’s easy to see why confusion prevails. But, Cleveland Clinic experts say, recent studies comparing these different diets have found that the proportion of carbohydrates, proteins and fats in your diet do not influence weight loss. 

This means, in a nutshell, you can lose weight with any diet as long as you burn more calories than you take in. That’s the secret.

2. Know how many calories you need. Would you believe that of the half of Americans who are dieting at any given time, only 12 percent know how many calories they should consume daily? This number, which for adults ranges from 1,600 to 3,000 a day, depends on your age, gender and activity level. [Here is a useful daily calorie calculator]

3. Change your calorie intake to lose weight. If you want to lose weight, eat fewer calories than you burn. Eat 500 to 1,000 fewer calories per day and you will lose weight, often one to two pounds per week. But don’t be discouraged when weight loss begins to slow after a few weeks of dieting – this is a normal event as your body adjusts to your new diet. Keep watching calories and exercising and you will keep heading toward your weight loss goal!

4. Don’t be fooled by fad diets. More isn’t always better. In fact, it can be harmful. Any loss of more than two pounds a week is usually just water weight. Studies also show that the faster weight comes off, the quicker it is regained. Stick to a diet that has a goal of only one to two pounds weight loss a week [even better, in the long run, would be one pound per month].

5. Choose a diet you can live with. For your weight loss and weight maintenance efforts to succeed, you must continually manage your calories. No one diet is better than another. Studies show dieters tend to lose five to 10 pounds over the course of a year, regardless which diet they pick. What’s important is to pick a diet that works for you and that you can stick with. And if you’re not successful, pick a different diet next time.

Body shape is as important as weight

May 31, 2008

Are you an Apple, or a Pear?

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Several recent studies and articles have highlighted how important WHERE we store fat is to our health. Excess weight is generally stored either in the abdominal area or in the hips, thighs, and buttocks, giving rise to the descriptive terms “Apple” and “Pear.” If you are an Apple (and these shapes appear to be partly determined by genes), you tend to have more visceral fat (fat around the abdominal organs) and this can lead to various diseases (type 2 diabetes, some types of cancer, heart problems, urinary problems, dementia, hypertension, and stroke). The only benefit to the Apple shape is lower risk of osteoporosis. Overweight men and post-menopausal women tend to be Apples. Also, smoking is associated with abdominal fat accumulation.

Pears are not as much at risk for the serious diseases listed above, but are more likely to suffer from osteoporosis, varicose veins, and cellulite. While a Pear can become an Apple, Apples do not morph into Pears.

The good news? Here is a quote from an excellent article on this topic in the U. C. Berkeley Wellness Letter (June, 2008):

While abdominal fat tends to accumulate faster than other fat, it also tends to come off faster. [More good news:] losing just 2 inches from the waist reduces coronary risk by 11% in men and 15% in women, according to one recent study.

Further information from Weight Management for Your Life:

Some research indicates that elevated waist circumference (Men: equal to or greater than 40 inches; Women: equal to or greater than 35 inches) is a more specific risk factor for some diseases, such as prediabetes, than weight or BMI. An increasing waist-to-hip ratio may be a better indicator of coronary artery calcification than either waist circumference or BMI.  Therefore, weight distribution, as opposed to weight alone or BMI, must be taken into consideration; belly weight (abdominal obesity, “visceral fat,” or “central adiposity”) is of most concern. [see also here]