Posts Tagged ‘cycling’

Clitoris Awareness Week meets National Bike Month

May 7, 2013

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May is National Bike Month and this week is International Clitoris Awareness Week. So, how do the two fit together?

Clitoris awareness, unlike penis awareness, is not a given. Female children and girls are less aware of the details of their anatomy than boys are. And historically the clitoris has been an object of denial, scorn and even violence (as in female circumcision). This article, for example, documents the  psychological harm done by lack of accurate emphasis on this important organ.

So what does any of this have to do with cycling? Aside from anecdotal reports of spontaneous orgasms occurring during cycling (both men and women), there are other effects of bicycle seats meeting female genitalia, as well described in this blog post . Similar problems occur for men (sometimes resulting in impotence), but this is not Penis Awareness Week — one could argue that every week is.

If you find yourself shocked, embarrassed, or snickering about this blog post, you have just demonstrated the need for Clitoris Awareness Week. I admit, I first heard about it on Weekend Update (on SNL, a comedy TV show) and thought it was pretty silly. But further thought has convinced me it is also serious, and worth publicizing.

For all you ever wanted to know about the clitoris, and more, see this web site.

My Review of Navigator 2.0 WSD

May 4, 2012

Excellent, with one exception

By ChasSC from SC on 5/4/2012
4out of 5

Pros: Durable, Stylish, Lightweight, Comfortable, Versatile

Cons: Need to upgrade chain

Best Uses: Leisurely Rides, Uneven Surfaces, Street Riding, Commuting, Exercise

Describe Yourself: Casual/ Recreational

Was this a gift?: No

I am a 69 year old male and traded in a 4 year old Specialized Expedition Sport for this one. I much prefer the “women’s” design, with low step-over, to the high cross-bar type. The Trek and Specialized bikes are comparable, but I like this one better — smoother ride, better fit. Initially, the gear shifting on this bike was rough and clunky, and the bike store owner finally told me the chains Trek uses on this bike are of inferior quality. He gave me a free upgraded chain, and it made a tremendous difference. I ride about 10 miles per day for exercise, fun, and grocery shopping. My wife has the Navigator 1.0 (and likes it), but the 2.0 is definitely worth the price difference. One odd thing is that the tires on the 2.0 hold 60 -80 psi, while those on the 1.0 hold 45 – 60. The bike dealer did not know this, so be sure to check for yourself.

(legalese)

Give up a car? Get a bike? Maybe.

August 13, 2008

After decades of being a two-car family, my wife and I recently gave up one of them and bought two bikes. Now, don’t think we are being heroic — we are both retired and live in a very convenient in-town neighborhood. We can walk or bike to many stores and restaurants and friends’ houses, and the climate here is pretty good. Still, it is very nice not paying for insurance, taxes, upkeep and depreciation on the car we gave up. We definitely are driving less than we used to, and I go days at a time without driving (my wife often takes the car on out-of-town trips to visit family, and at those times I am completely car-free).

A huge bonus is that we have found we love cycling around town, and I went in with a friend who has an SUV to buy a very good bike rack, so we can sometimes take the bikes to other places for a change in scenery.

To really see what is possible (and difficult) when you become car-free, check out this blog.

If you have found a way to cut down on driving, and increased your use of more healthy forms of transportation (for you and the planet), let us know.